Charles Babbage Quote

Mill, in speaking of Hume's celebrated principle, "that nothing is credible which is contradictory to experience, or at variance with the laws of nature," calls it a very plain and harmless proposition, being, in effect, nothing more than that whatever is contradictory to a complete induction is incredible. Admit the existence of a Deity, and the possibility of a miracle is the natural consequence. No doubt our examination of the evidence which sustains an unusual phenomenon should be most carefully conducted ; but we must not measure the credibility or incredibility of an event by the narrow sphere of our own experience, nor forget that there is a Divine energy which overrides what we familiarly call the laws of nature.


"Passages from the life of a philosopher", Appendix, p. 488 - Passages from the Life of a Philosopher (1864)

Picture Quote 1

Mill, in speaking of Hume's celebrated principle, that nothing is credible which is contradictory to experience, or at variance with the laws of...

Picture Quote 2

Mill, in speaking of Hume's celebrated principle, that nothing is credible which is contradictory to experience, or at variance with the laws of...

Picture Quote 3

Mill, in speaking of Hume's celebrated principle, that nothing is credible which is contradictory to experience, or at variance with the laws of...

Picture Quote 4

Mill, in speaking of Hume's celebrated principle, that nothing is credible which is contradictory to experience, or at variance with the laws of...